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Starless
by Jacqueline Carey

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Quite the enjoyable story! I enjoyed the adventures of Khai and Zariya and company as they save the world from the terrible dangers of Miasmus who is trying to end it all. It is a good standalone book and has a very satisfactory ending!

The Sin In The Steel
by Ryan Van Loan

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Well, this certainly starts off with excitement with a roomful of dead people, an arrest and trial, a twist that makes Buc and Eld start a new case to find out about missing ships and sugar. Add in a couple of rival gods and their crazy followers and you have a very full adventure. It is best described like this: Gods, missing ships. Cannibals. Pirates. Holy artifacts. And you sent Buc and Eld into the midst of that with a paltry brig beneath their feet? Plus scary ghostships and Shambles. Buc acts a lot like Sherlock (which I think is the point) but sometimes her superiority which she doesn't bother to hide (along with the kan use) was more of a hindrance. And though she is smart, she kept getting into stupid situations by not thinking all the way through. I think she is best summed up with this : Manners are a terrible affliction. Thank the Gods I am immune. Eld on the other hand has issues due to being the only survivor after his regiment is massacred when his orders were skewed by the Sin Eater mage. He seems really old sometimes though apparently he is only 19. That was confusing but maybe because this is an ARC. It could be different in the final version. Eld is definitely nicer than Buc though and has better manners. The descriptions of the lands are well done and it is easy to visualize it. It is a mixture of first person (via Buc) and third person from various other characters like Eld, or Chan Sha. That turned out differently than I thought and I am very curious about the Sin Eaters and their god and what the Dead God's followers are trying to do.

Betty before X
by Ilyasah Shabazz

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A middle grade novel encompassing life of an African American girl in Detroit in the 1940s, showing family dynamics and racism. As Betty grows up, she is involved in civil rights, obtains an education culminating in a PhD after her husband, Malcolm X, is assassinated. A quote by Betty's daughter in the author's note - "It is not falling that defines you, it's the process of what you determine to do each time you stand."

Boy From The Woods
by Coben

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Interesting plot seemed to be going in one direction then suddenly changed to coincide with current political atmosphere in America.

Free Lunch
by Rex Ogle

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Story of a boy who is embarrassed by his dysfunctional family but learns to overcome all of that.higy recommended for middle schoolers. Al's

Tears Of The Giraffe
by Alexander Mccall Smith Ladies Detective Series

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Entertaining and gifted writer

The Knockout Queen
by Rufi Thorpe

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Not the best book I've read, but it told the tale of two marginalized teens dealing with way too many issues in a unique way. Would I recommend it to others? Depends on the person.

Monk's Hood
by Ellis Peters

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Brother Cadfael’s long-lost love, Richildis, moves into Shrewsbury Abbey’s grounds as her husband, lord of a minor manor in Wales, is seeking to retire. When her husband is murdered with a poisonous oil made by Cadfael himself, suspicion falls on Edwin, Richildis’ only son. Cadfael must examine the evidence within the abbey and afield in Wales to discover the truth. Monk’s Hood’s engaging premise revisits many familiar characters and develops them further. For instance, Prior Robert’s opportunity to lead the abbey in Abbot Heribert’s absence chafes at those under his control, including the ever-patient Cadfael. Brother Cadfael’s long-lost love, Richildis, moves into Shrewsbury Abbey’s grounds as her husband, lord of a minor manor in Wales, is seeking to retire. When her husband is murdered with a poisonous oil made by Cadfael himself, suspicion falls on Edwin, Richildis’ only son. Cadfael must examine the evidence within the abbey and afield in Wales to discover the truth. Monk’s Hood’s engaging premise revisits many familiar characters and develops them further. For instance, Prior Robert’s opportunity to lead the abbey in Abbot Heribert’s absence chafes at those under his control, including the ever-patient Cadfael. This plot point and character development additionally highlights Peters’ impressive knowledge of the period, for both Prior Robert and Abbot Heribert were real figures in Shrewsbury Abbey during the years concerned. Her interpretation of Welsh and Norman law and of attitudes towards the Norman overlords in the period are both accurate and understandable, bringing the reader into greater sympathy with the medieval characters. In this novel, Peters explores contentment in many facets. Each character faces some burden – for instance, one tricked into becoming a villain instead of a free man, one sent to become a monk by his unkind uncle, one married unwisely… Some accept their problems and learn to see the good, while some chafe and struggle. The virtue of contentment is pictured as a necessity for enjoying life at all. Cadfael encourages his protégés to accept the joys of life as gifts from God, and through him the book also addresses God’s justice and forgiveness as he counsels living a virtuous life after sin instead of dwelling in despair. All in all, these thoughts are stimulating and helpful. Monk’s Hood is another excellent addition to the Cadfael Chronicles. The series is recommended for those who have enjoyed reading the mysteries of Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, or G. K. Chesterton. Just remember to read the previous books in the series, A Morbid Taste for Bones and One Corpse Too Many, first.

Dinosaur Time Peggy Parish
by Peggy Parish

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I like it because I love dinosaurs. I like the meat eaters.

Fried Green Tomatoes At The Whistle Stop Cafe
by Fanny Flagg

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Enjoyed the characters. I could picture myself in this little town with the colorful descriptions.


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